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Get your kids into edible flowers this summer

Tip-toeing through the garden and taking time to smell the roses are all well and good, but turning edible flowers into incredible culinary creations adds a whole new dimension to floral appreciation.

Before you begin to bake up some blossoms, please read this information sheet about edible flowers versus inedible (and poisonous) flowers. And remember to never eat flowers that have been grown or come into contact with pesticides… If you aren’t sure, don’t eat it!

Done and done? Let’s get ready to cook up some flower power.

Tigerlilys (aka Day Lilys)

Those stunning rusty flowers are everywhere just about now, and the entire plant is edible. (Try cooking the stems like you would asparagus.) While you can use the flower to decorate salads, try sauteeing the buds for a delicious treat.  The good people over at honest-food.com have a great how-to.

 

Dandelions

You may have already been using dandelion greens in your salads, but did you know the flower is edible too? Try battering and frying the flowers for a totally new twist on everyone’s favourite weed.

 

Carnations

Not just for senior prom any more… Carnations have a surprisingly sweet flavour to their petals that go perfectly with dessert. Use carnations to decorate your cakes and cupcakes, or candy the petals by dipping them in sugar and water that’s been boiled to the candy point.

 

Calendula or Field Marigolds

You might see these beauties growing in wild urban spaces or in the country. Their bright yellow hue and slightly bitter taste make them perfect for dressing up rice dishes like paella. (Marigolds are also called “Poor Man’s Saffron” because of their bright yellow colour, making them a good substitute for the real thing.)

 

Clover

Spiky clover pops up pretty much everywhere, but did you know that you can nosh these pretty weeds? We recommend adding them to salads, but we think this red clover lemonade looks pretty unbelievable, too.

Photos via Wikipedia, Honest-Food.com, Whatabloom.com, TheDailySpud, chut79, informedfarmers.com, OntheGreenPath.com

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